Mark your calendars for the 2014 Minnesota Library Legislative Day

From Jim Weikum, Arrowhead Library System and 2014 Chair of the MLA Legislative Committee:

Minnesota Library Legislative Day has been scheduled for Wednesday, March 5, 2014 in St. Paul. Additional details will be made available as that date draws closers, but one notable change from previous years is that our base of operations for the day will be Room 400N in the State Office Building rather than in Library at the Minnesota Judicial Center. Accessing the Judicial Center through the tunnels is would be challenging as a a result of increased security measures.

SELCO staff will book appointments with the legislators from the SELCO/SELS region. Everyone is free to join the office visits on Legislative Day. In addition we are developing information packets for each legislator and will arrange carpooling to the Capitol on March 5.

Video and Handouts from Making a Difference for Libraries in DC

Didn’t have an opportunity to tune into the ALA Washington Office webinar “Make a Difference for Libraries in D.C. (Really, It’s Possible)” held on September 17, 2013? You’re in luck! The video and handouts from the program presented by Stephanie Vance, “Advocacy Guru” and longtime friend of libraries. The link to everything you need can be found here.  A link directly to the video is below.

Once again, Vance does a nice job of giving an overview of the issues at hand which currently revolve around the potential government shutdown. However, she also gives some practical advocacy tips that can be helpful no matter the political climate. A good way to spend about 50 minutes of your day.

2013 Minnesota Legislative Session Summary

The following information was sent via e-mail on June 5, 2013 from Elaine Keefe, MLA/MEMO Lobbyist. Additional linked information added.

State Budget Overview

The Legislature and Governor Dayton agreed on a budget for the 2014-15 biennium that erases a projected $627 million deficit and provides additional funding for education and local governments.  In order to raise the revenue to accomplish this, income taxes were increased on the top 2% of income tax filers, cigarette taxes were increased by $1.60 per pack and the sales tax was broadened to include some business services.  With DFL majorities in both the House and Senate and a DFL governor, the budget negotiations were far less contentious than they were two years ago when most of state government was shut down for 20 days because Governor Dayton and the Republican-controlled Legislature were unable to agree on a budget. 

 Here is a summary of legislative action affecting libraries:

Education Payment Shift

Repayment of the shift has proceeded much more rapidly than many had expected.  Under current law, whenever a state economic forecast projects a budget surplus, the surplus must first be used to replenish the state budget reserve (if necessary) and any remaining surplus must be used to repay the shift until a 90% /10% payment schedule is achieved. Although the November 2012 and February 2013 forecasts both projected a deficit for the 2014-15 biennium, those forecasts also projected surpluses at the close of the current biennium, which ends on June 30.  Hence, the shift was reduced by $1.3 billion after the November forecast and by another $290 million after the February forecast, resulting in a current payment schedule of 86.4% / 13.6%.  Under the budget deal reached by the Governor and Legislature, if there is a surplus after the close of the current biennium, that amount will be used to repay the shift without waiting for the November forecast.  The current estimate is that this will be another $300 million.  This should be sufficient to reach a 90/10 payment schedule. 

Library Appropriations in the K-12 Budget

Current funding was maintained for Regional Library Basic System Support (RLBSS), Regional Library Telecommunications Aid, Multitype funding, ELM and Telecommunications Equity Aid. We also succeeded in getting an amendment included in the omnibus education bill changing the terminology for RLBSS and Multitype funding from “grant” to “aid” to better reflect how these programs are administered. 

Homework Help

Our bill to fund an online Homework Help service statewide was introduced in both bodies but did not receive a hearing.  There was heavy emphasis this year on providing additional funding for large existing programs, leaving little room in the budget for new initiatives. Our bill was introduced in the Senate by Senator John Hoffman (DFL – Champlin) and in the House by Rep. Kathy Brynaert (DFL – Mankato)

General Education Formula

The general education formula (which is the main source of funding for school media centers) will increase by 1.5% in each year of the biennium.  It will rise from the current $5,224 per pupil to $5,302 in FY 2014 and to $5,806 in FY 2015.

Total Operating Capital

MDE included language in its omnibus policy bill that would have prohibited school from using total operating capital to pay for annual licensing fees for software.  I raised a concern about that language on behalf of MEMO.  After much negotiation, MDE agreed to amend the language to specifically allow the use of total operating capital for software and annual licensing fees.  This passed in the omnibus education bill.

Minitex and MnLINK

Funding for Minitex and MnLINK was increased by $300,000 per year.  It is the first increase for Minitex and MnLINK since the 2007 session.  Our authors were Senator Kent Eken (DFL – Twin Valley) and Rep. Ryan Winkler (DFL – Golden Valley)

Higher Ed Systems

MnSCU funding was increased by $102 million and the University of Minnesota by $79 million.  Most of these funds are earmarked for freezing undergraduate tuition. 

Legacy Funding for Regional Public Libraries

Regional Public Library Systems received $3 million per year to provide arts and historical programs. This is the same level of funding provided during the current biennium.  The funds will be distributed via a revised formula that replaces the equalization factor with a “qualifying system entities” factor.  We had to fight hard to retain this level of funding after the Senate bill proposed to reduce it to $1 million per year in an effort to maximize the funding for the State Arts Board.  Many thanks to everyone who contacted their senators and the members of the Legacy conference committee to urge them to maintain the current funding level for regional public libraries.  You were definitely heard! 

Legacy Funding for the Minnesota Digital Library

The Minnesota Digital Library received $300,000 per year.  This is an increase over the current $250,000 per year appropriation.  As in the past, this funding is appropriated to the Minnesota Historical Society with a directive to cooperate with Minitex and jointly share the appropriation. 

Legacy Percentage to the State Arts Board

The Senate Legacy bill added a provision in statute requiring that 50% of all future appropriations from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund would be allocated to the State Arts Board.  Senator Cohen insisted that this was the intent when the Legacy Amendment was passed.  The final bill requires that 47% go to the State Arts board in the future. 

Data Privacy

Our bill to extend current data privacy protection for public library patron records to electronic data stored by a vendor was introduced by Senator Kari Dziedzic (DFL – Minneapolis) and Rep. Steve Simon (DFL – St. Louis Park).  It was heard in both bodies and passed out of the House Data Practices Subcommittee before we learned that other provisions in current law already afforded this protection to such data.  Our bill became the vehicle for the omnibus data practices bill, but our provision was deleted after we learned it was unnecessary. 

Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants

Although it was not a traditional bonding year, the Governor and the House were eager to see a large bonding bill pass. We were encouraged to get a bill introduced to fund Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants, and so a bill to provide $3 million was introduced by Rep. Mary Murphy (DFL – Hermantown) and Senator Alice Johnson (DFL – Spring Lake Park).  The House included $1.5 million in the final version of its bonding bill, but the bill failed to get the required supermajority on the House floor.  It needed 81 votes and only got 76 votes.  The Senate never did produce a major bonding bill.  In the end, a very small $176 million bill passed, with most of the funds allocated for renovation of the Capitol.  A major bonding bill will be on the agenda for 2014. 

Aid to Cities and Counties

Aid to cities was increased by $80 million and aid to counties was increased by $40 million.  The trade-off is that levy limits will be in place for 2014.  The limits are relatively generous — the city or county’s aid plus levy for either 2012 or 2013, whichever is greater, plus 3%.

Sales Tax on City and County Purchases

Cities and counties will no longer have to pay sales tax on their purchases beginning January 1, 2014.  The sales tax was imposed on local units of government (except for school districts) in 1992 as a way to solve a budget deficit.  There have been repeated attempts to repeal the tax since then, and despite broad agreement that the tax was bad policy, it was difficult to repeal it because of the loss of revenue to the state. This is a great win for cities and counties.  Public libraries were partially taxed and partially exempted in 1992 when the tax was first passed.  We won a full exemption a few years later, so this will not have a direct effect on public libraries.

Contact Your MN House Representative to Support Library Construction Grants!

On Friday the Minnesota House will take up the bonding bill on the floor.  The bill as it emerged from committee did not include any funding for libraries.  However, Rep. Alice Hausman, chief author of the bill, has posted an amendment to the bill online that would appropriate $1.5 million for Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants. 
 Please e-mail your representative immediately and urge him/her to support the Hausman A-13-0703 amendment to the bonding bill.  Explain that it includes $1.5 million for Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants.

Minnesota Library Legislative Update 05-15-2013

The following information was sent via e-mail on May 15, 2013 from Elaine Keefe, MLA/MEMO Lobbyist. Additional linked information added.

With just a few days left in the legislative session, final decisions are starting to be made on budget bills.

Minitex/MnLINK

Great news!  The higher education conference committee reached agreement on the omnibus higher ed bill this evening (May 15, 2013) and it includes the $300,000 per year funding increase for Minitex and MnLINK that was included in the Senate bill. Thank you to all of you who wrote to the conferees urging them to support the Senate position.  Please write to thank the conferees for their support, especially Senator Kent Eken, Senator Terri Bonoff and Rep. Gene Pelowski.

Aid to Cities and Counties

The tax conference committee is still negotiating the omnibus tax bill, but they have agreed on an increase of $80 million in aid to cities and $40 million in aid to counties. 

Legacy

Tonight (May 15, 2013) the Senate passed its Legacy bill on the floor.  I’m pleased to report that during the debate several senators gave Senator Cohen quite an earful about the reduction in funding to regional public libraries. Thank you to all of you who contacted your senators. It is making a difference.  The conference committee will be appointed tomorrow.  As soon as the conferees are appointed I will send out their contact information.

Minnesota Library Legislative Update 05-12-2013

The following information was sent via e-mail on May 12, 2013 from Elaine Keefe, MLA/MEMO Lobbyist. Additional linked information added.

It’s crunch time.  The Legislature must adjourn on May 20, 2013 — one week from Monday.

Budget Deal

Today (May 12, 2013) the Governor and legislative leaders announced that they have agreed on a budget deal. The deal includes significant increases for E-12 education ($475 million) and higher education ($250 million) and a smaller cut in health & human services than legislators had proposed (a $50 million cut rather than $150 million). The school funding shift will be repaid. To pay for all of this and cover the $627 million deficit, income taxes will be increased on couples with taxable income of $250,000 and on individuals with taxable income of $150,000. Sales taxes will be expanded to some business services but not to consumer services or clothing. The cigarette tax will be increased. Details will be worked out by the various budget conference committees.

E-12 Education

The conference committee met for the first time on Thursday, May 9, 2013.  They adopted several identical provisions, including two items important to MLA/MEMO. 

  1. The change in terminology from “grant” to “aid” for RLBSS and Multi-type funding
  2. Clarification that total operating capital funds can be used for computer hardware, software and annual licensing fees
Higher Education

The conference committee will meet for the first time on Monday, May 13, 2013. The funding increase for Minitex/MnLINK that is included in the Senate higher ed bill but not in the House bill has a better chance now that the agreed-upon target ($250 million) is closer to the Senate target ($260 million) than the House target ($150 million).  Our Senate author, Senator Kent Eken (DFL – Twin Valley) is on the conference committee and told me he intends to fight hard for the increase included in the Senate bill.  If you haven’t yet contacted the conferees to urge them to support the increase in the Senate bill, please do so.

Legislator Email Address Phone Number
Rep. Gene Pelowski (DFL – Winona) rep.gene.pelowski@house.mn 651-296-8637 or 888-681-8226
Rep. Ryan Winkler (DFL – Golden Valley) rep.ryan.winkler@house.mn 651-296-7026
Rep. Paul Rosenthal (DFL – Edina) rep.paul.rosenthal@house.mn 651-296-7803
Rep. Zach Dorholt (DFL- St. Cloud) rep.zachary.dorholt@house.mn 651-296-6612 or 800-920-5884
Rep. Bud Nornes (R – Fergus Falls) rep.bud.nornes@house.mn 651-296-4946 or 800-336-8017
Senator Terri Bonoff (DFL – Minnetonka) sen.terri.bonoff@senate.mn 651-296-4314
Senator Greg Clausen (DFL – Apple Valley) sen.greg.clausen@senate.mn 651-296-4120
Senator Kent Eken (DFL – Twin Valley) sen.kent.eken@senate.mn 651-296-3205
Senator Jeremy Miller (R – Winona) sen.jeremy.miller@senate.mn 651-296-5649
Senator Sandy Pappas (DFL – St. Paul) sen.sandy.pappas@senate.mn 651-296-1802
Legacy

The House Legacy bill passed on the floor on Friday, May 10, 2013. The Senate Legacy bill was unveiled in the Senate Legacy Subcommittee on Thursday, May 9, 2013.  It includes $300,000 per year for the Minnesota Digital Library (the amount requested) and $1 million per year for regional public libraries.  This is a huge reduction from the $3 million per year currently allocated to regional public libraries.  Senator Dick Cohen, chair of both the Senate Finance Committee and the Legacy Subcommittee of the Senate Finance Committee, has opposed Legacy funding for libraries from the beginning. His position has been that only those who advocated for the constitutional amendment should share in the funds generated.  He views all other recipients as interlopers, including libraries.  Senator Cohen’s goal has been that 50% of the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund is to be allocated to the State Arts Board.  Currently about 43% is allocated to the State Arts Board.  The Senate bill includes a provision requiring that in the future 50% of the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund shall be allocated to the State Arts Board.  The initial version of the Senate Legacy bill distributed the funds to regional public libraries under the RLBSS formula, as has been done the past two biennia.  I subsequently spoke with Senator Cohen and he agreed to amend the bill to change the formula in accordance with the MLA/MEMO platform and to require that the funds be distributed in 10 equal payments.  That amendment was adopted on Friday and the bill was passed out of the Subcomittee. It will be heard in the full Senate Finance Committee on Monday, May 13, 2013.

Minnesota Library Legislative Update 04-29-2013

The following information was sent via e-mail on April 29, 2013 from Elaine Keefe, MLA/MEMO Lobbyist. Additional linked information added.

The Legislature must adjourn three weeks from today (April 29, 2013).  Most of the omnibus budget bills were passed on the floor of the House and Senate last week (week of April 22, 2013).  Conference committees are in the process of being appointed and will begin meeting later this week. Here is the status of the major bills affecting libraries:

Omnibus Higher Education Bill (SF 1236)

The bill has passed both the House and the Senate.

The Senate higher education bill includes a $300,000 per year increase in funding for Minitex/MnLINK.  The House maintains current funding.
 
Please contact the conferees listed below and ask them to support the Senate funding level for Minitex/MnLINK:   

Legislator Email Address Phone Number
Rep. Gene Pelowski (DFL – Winona) rep.gene.pelowski@house.mn 651-296-8637 or 888-681-8226
Rep. Ryan Winkler (DFL – Golden Valley) rep.ryan.winkler@house.mn 651-296-7026
Rep. Paul Rosenthal (DFL – Edina) rep.paul.rosenthal@house.mn 651-296-7803
Rep. Zach Dorholt (DFL- St. Cloud) rep.zachary.dorholt@house.mn 651-296-6612 or 800-920-5884
Rep. Bud Nornes (R – Fergus Falls) rep.bud.nornes@house.mn 651-296-4946 or 800-336-8017
Senator Terri Bonoff (DFL – Minnetonka) sen.terri.bonoff@senate.mn 651-296-4314
Senator Greg Clausen (DFL – Apple Valley) sen.greg.clausen@senate.mn 651-296-4120
Senator Kent Eken (DFL – Twin Valley) sen.kent.eken@senate.mn 651-296-3205
Senator Jeremy Miller (R – Winona) sen.jeremy.miller@senate.mn 651-296-5649
Senator Sandy Pappas (DFL – St. Paul) sen.sandy.pappas@senate.mn 651-296-1802
Omnibus E-12 Education Bill (HF 630)

The bill has passed both the House and Senate. Here are the highlights for MLA and MEMO:

  • Both the House and Senate versions of the bill maintain all library appropriations at current levels.
  • Both the House and Senate change the terminology in statute from “grant” to “aid” for Regional Library Basic System Support and Multitype funding.
  • The Senate includes language clarifying that total operating capital can be used by schools to purchase computer, software and annual licensing fees. I expect the House to accept this language in conference.
  • The House increases the general education formula by 2% in FY 14 and 2% in FY 15. The Senate increases the general education formula by 1% in FY 14. The House had more money to spend than the Senate did.

House conferees are:

Rep. Paul Marquart (DFL – Dilworth)
Rep. Carolos Mariani (DFL – St. Paul)
Rep. Kathy Brynaert (DFL – Mankato)
Rep. Will Morgan (DFL – Burnsville)
Rep.Dean Urdahl (R – Grove City)

Senate conferees are:
Senator Chuck Wiger (DFL – Maplewood)
Senator Patricia Torres Ray (DFL – Minneapolis)
Senator LeRoy Stumpf (DFL – Plummer)
Senator Alice Johnson (DFL – Spring Lake Park)
Senator Kevin Dahle (DFL – Northfield)

Omnibus Tax Bill (HF 677)

The bill has passed the House and is currently being debated in the Senate. Both bills raise a substantial amount of new revenue via increases in income taxes, sales taxes and and cigarette taxes. The House also raises taxes on alcohol.  Both bills include property tax relief.
 
The House bill increases aid to cities by $80 million and aid to counties by $30 million.  The Senate bill increases aid to cities by $80 million and aid to counties by $40 million.  These increases will be helpful to public libraries.

Legacy

The House Legacy bill was scheduled to be taken up on the House floor 10 days ago and then was pulled.  Rumor has it that controversy over the outdoor heritage appropriations have made it questionable whether the bill can pass.  The Senate has not yet put its bill together.

Minnesota Library Legislative Update 04-09-2013

The following information was sent via e-mail on April 9, 2013 from Elaine Keefe, MLA/MEMO Lobbyist. Additional linked information added.

House Omnibus Education Bill

The House omnibus education bill was posted online this afternoon (April 9, 2013).  It maintains current funding for all library appropriations — Regional Library Basic System Support (RLBSS), Regional Library Telecommunication Aid (RLTA), Multi-type funding, the Electronic Library for Minnesota (ELM) and Telecommunication Equity Aid (TEA).  The bill also increases the general education formula from the current $5,224 per pupil to $5,328 in FY 2014 and $5,433 in FY 2015.  It also repays the education funding shift to the 90/10 payment schedule.

Senate Omnibus Education Bill

The Senate bill will be released Thursday morning, April 11, 2013.

Senate Higher Education Funding Bill

Great news! The Senate higher education bill increases funding for Minitex and MnLINK by $300,000 per year.  Please send thanks to our chief author, Senator Kent Eken and the Committee chair, Senator Terri Bonoff.

House Higher Education Funding Bill

As expected, the House higher education bill maintains current funding for Minitex and MnLINK.  Once the higher ed bill gets to conference committee, we will need to press the conferees to go with the higher funding level in the Senate bill.

Bonding

We had not planned to pursue funding for Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants this year, but were encouraged to introduce a bill by House leaders.  We did have a bill introduced to provide $3 million, but today the House bonding bill was unveiled and it does not include any funding for libraries.  We will pursue it next year.

Legacy

As previously reported, the House Legacy bill includes $3 million per year for regional public libraries and $300,000 per year for the Minnesota Digital Library.  The Senate has just announced the process it will follow.  Our Legacy request for regional public libraries will originate in the Senate E-12 Education Division before going to the Senate Legacy Subcommittee.

Minnesota Library Legislative Update 03-29-2013

The following information was sent via e-mail on March 29, 2013 from Elaine Keefe, MLA/MEMO Lobbyist. Additional linked information added.

The Legislature is taking its annual Passover/Easter break this week and will return to work on Tuesday, April 2, 2013. At that point the Legislature will have seven weeks to conclude its work before the constitutional adjournment deadline of May 20, 2013.

Committee Deadlines

Last Friday (March 22, 2013) was the second committee deadline. To meet that deadline, bills must have passed through policy committees and have been referred to either the floor or a finance committee in both the House and the Senate.  Bills that have not met the deadline cannot proceed on their own, but they can still be amended onto other bills that are moving forward.

Budget

Last week House and Senate leaders released their respective budget targets for each area of the budget (E-12 education, higher education, health & human services, transportation, etc.).  Over the next two weeks committees will be unveiling their omnibus finance bills, marking them up and passing them.  The deadline for passing omnibus finance bills out of the Senate Finance Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee is Friday, April 19, 2013.

Legacy

The House Legacy Committee will release the Arts and Cultural Heritage article of its omnibus bill on Wednesday, April 3, 2013.  We have strong support in the House and I expect libraries to do well in that bill.  The Senate Legacy Subcommittee has not met yet (except for two joint hearings with the House on items unrelated to libraries) and no meetings have been announced. Mark Ranum and I have met with most of the members of the subcommittee and they have been supportive. However, we have not been able to meet with the chair, who has previously taken the position that libraries should apply to the State Arts Board for grants rather than receiving Legacy funding directly.  We have submitted a proposal for funding to the Legacy subcommittee and I have met with the subcommittee staff twice.  I’m told we will have an opportunity to make a presentation at some point, but no schedule has been mapped out.  This is consistent with the pattern that has existed since the Legacy amendment was passed in 2008.  The House comes out with its bill first, and the Senate takes a look at it and then puts together its own version.

Minitex/MnLINK

As reported previously, our bill to increase funding for Minitex and MnLINK was heard in the Senate Higher Education Policy and Budget Division on March 19, 2013, and it was well-received by the committee.  We have a very supportive chair in Senator Terri Bonoff and her committee has a fairly generous budget target, so I am hopeful we will see an increase for Minitex and MnLINK in the Senate.  The House is another matter.  When Mark Ranum, Valerie Horton and I met with the House Higher Education chair, Rep. Gene Pelowski, he told us flat out that this was not the year when we could expect to see an increase, even though he agrees that Minitex and MnLINK are valuable programs.  His goal for this year is structural reform of what he views as a bloated higher ed system.  He said that we would have our chance in the next budget cycle two years from now. The House budget target for higher education is far lower than the Senate’s target ($150 million in new spending in the House vs. $263 million in the Senate).  Our bill has not received a hearing and the omnibus bill is scheduled to be unveiled on Wednesday.

Homework Help

I am very disappointed to report that our bill will not receive a hearing in either body. There are several reasons for this, but I think the main one is that, like the Governor, legislators are focusing resources on the big pieces in the budget — the general ed formula, special education and early learning (all day kindergarten and preschool scholarships).  The chair of the House Education Finance Committee, Rep. Paul Marquart, reacted quite negatively to the idea of Homework Help when we met with him.  He said, “We are struggling to find the money to adequately fund the things we already have — we can’t fund anything new.”  I had hoped that he would come around after budget targets were announced.  The House education target is a healthy number — $550 million in new spending.  I again asked for a hearing but was told no.  Senators on the E-12 Education Budget Division, including the chair, were supportive of Homework Help in our meetings.  However, the Senate’s budget target for education is quite skimpy when one takes into account that legislative leaders have dictated that the bulk of the target be spent on buying down education levies and fully funding all day kindergarten.  The Senate will probably have to choose between increasing the general ed formula and special ed — they don’t have enough money to do both. In this scenario, Homework Help became a casualty.

Bonding

Although we have normally pursued funding for Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants in the second year of the biennium because that’s when the Legislature traditionally passes a major bonding bill, the House has been pushing hard for a significant bonding bill this year.  At the urging of Rep. Alice Hausman, chair of the House Capital Investment Committee, we had a bill introduced to provide $3 million for Library Accessibility and Improvement Grants.  The bill is HF 1501/ SF 1473Rep. Mary Murphy and Senator Alice Johnson are our chief authors and we have a great bi-partisan group of co-authors.  The Senate seems to be warming up to the idea of a larger than usual bonding bill in the first year of the biennium, so there may be an opportunity for us.  Stay tuned.

U.S. House passes the Workforce Investment Act

Excerpts from the District Dispatch, online news blog from the American Library Association’s Washington Office.

On March 15, 2013, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 803, the Supporting Knowledge and Investing in Lifelong Skills (SKILLS) Act, reauthorize the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Library-specific provisions in the bill include the following items:

  • Ensure the state workforce investment plan includes a description of the actions that will be taken by the state to foster communication, coordination, and partnerships with non-profit organizations – including public libraries (under section 112(b));
  • Ensure the local state workforce investment plan includes a description of the strategies and services that will be used in the local area to better coordinate workforce development programs with employment, training, and literacy services carried out by non-profit organizations – including libraries (under section 118(b)); and
  • Authorize public libraries that carry out employment, training, and literacy services as additional one-stop partners so they can better assist with workforce development activities (under section 121(b)(2)(B)).

Legislation now moves onto the U.S. Senate.  To read the original posting from the District Dispatch, click here.